Givenchy with camera, South of France, 1961 ©Tony Vaccaro Courtesy of Monroe Gallery of Photography
Givenchy with camera, South of France, 1961 ©Tony Vaccaro Courtesy of Monroe Gallery of Photography 
Kiss of Liberation: Sergeant Gene Costanzo kneels to kiss a little girl during spontaneous celebrations in the main square of the town of St. Briac, France, August 14, 1944 ©Tony Vaccaro Courtesy of Monroe Gallery of Photography
The Violinist, Venice, Italy, 1947 © Tony Vaccaro Courtesy of Monroe Gallery of Photography

Tony Vaccaro at 98

20/11/2020 - 17/01/2021

Monroe 
112 Don Gaspar Avenue 
 
NM 87501 Santa Fe

www.monroegallery.com   

 
Born in Greensburg, Pennsylvania on December 20, 1922, Tony Vaccaro was drafted into WWII and in June, 1944, he was on a boat heading toward Omaha Beach, six days after the first landings at Normandy. Denied access to the Signal Corps, Tony was determined to photograph the war.
After the war, Tony remained in Germany to photograph the rebuilding of the country for Stars And Stripes magazine. Returning to the US in 1950, Tony started his career as a commercial photographer.
As an antidote to man’s inhumanity, Tony focused his lens on those who gave of themselves: artists, writers, movie stars, and the beauty of fashion. By focusing on the splendor of life, Tony replaced the images of horror embedded in his eyes. This exhibition illustrates his will to live and advance the power of beauty in this life.
Now, nearing age 98, he is recovered from COVID-19, and is one of the few people alive who can claim to have survived the Battle of Normandy and COVID-19. He celebrates his 98th birthday on December 20.